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Saturday, 6 July, 2019 - 17:24

Nothing is more practical than rules to guide thinking. In this post I share the ten rules I use to think about technology and society. Personally I use them as tools to filter the hype that surrounds technology and to get to the critical questions of who benefits and loses, as well as what needs to be done to secure a more equitable society. I previously tweeted a version of these rules, and this posting responds to requests to expand them and to provide some useful links.
 

Rule 1. Technologies Are Inherently Political (Winner 1980). Langdon Winner famously argued that 'artifacts have politics' - that some technologies are "inherently political" due to inflexible features of their structure & operation. Other technologies, he argues, are political "by design," but open to flexible shaping that affects their possibilities & likely consequences. Winner provided the example of the height of the bridges to Long Island being designed...

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Talking about ICT4D: a typology

There's an interesting discussion going on within the civic-tech community about the lack of a common language for discussing the hugely diverse ways in which citizens are using technology to foster social change.

All ICT4D is Political

Emily Shaw wrote a great blog this week about 'Civic Tech', which, in case you have been living in a cave for the last year, is the new lingo for the field of 'citizen technology for social change'.

Lyon Declaration on ICT4D

The post-MDG Lyon Declaration on Access to Information and Development [pdf] is very welcome in that it represents a clear advance over the original Millennium Development Goal on ICT4D, but in my opinion the declaration does not go far enough in giving the most disadvantag

Keepod: a positive critique

Last week I got a call from mobile technology expert, and BBC Technology journalist Dan Simmons asking me to comment on the new keepod, an initiative that recently raised $40,000 on the Indigogo crowd-funding platform for their programme in Mathere, Nairobi.

Better Participatory Video Practice

I thought I had died and gone to PV heaven ...

 

ICT4D is Dead! Long Live ICT4D!

In a previous post I pushed back against James BonTempo's claim to have charted “The Slow Death of ICT4D”

ICT4D Masters Degrees Worldwide

Last week I had to do some 'quick & dirty' research online to work out whether the field of ICT4D was in its death throws as claimed by James BonTempo and Ken Banks or whether,

Death of ICT4D 'Greatly Exaggerated'

Upon reading his own obituary in the New York Times, Mark Twain famously declared that, "Reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated!".

 

Top ICT4D Conferences of 2014

As everyone is making preparations for the final ICT4D conference of the year ICTD2013 in Cape Town I though I would have a first hack at putting together an calendar of ICT4D conferences scheduled for 2014. 
 

A People-Centred Theory of Change for ICT4D?

In a previous post I suggested that a starting-point for a theory of change for (open) ICT4D might be, 'the application of human agency + human knowledge + (open) technology to solve human problems

A Theory of Change for ICT4D

Duncan Edwards posted a great piece last week entitled "The revolution will NOT be Open Data" in which he riffs on Gil Scott-Heron's critically-conscious lyrics.

ICT for Social Justice: hype debunked!

This week's 'ICT for Social Justice' event at Google Campus London was fascinating for a number of reasons: cool tech, debunked hype & geek critique.

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